Back to Events List

LGBTQ Inclusivity: Be Aware and Care

The federal Department of Health and Human Services has identified the lack of culturally competent health and social service providers as a significant barrier to quality care for many LGBTQ people. This training is designed to provide staff and volunteers with the knowledge that they will need to create inclusive environments for gender and sexual minority clients. This workshop will equip participants with an understanding of LGBTQ terminology, the differences between sexual orientation and gender identity, dispelling myths and stereotypes, risk factors and protective factors specific to the LGBTQ community, barriers in accessing services, and tools and strategies that agencies can use to improve access to services.

At the completion of this activity, the learner should be able to:

  1. Define common terms of reference in the LGBTQ community
  2. Describe the differences between gender identity and sexual orientation
  3. Explain the risks and barriers faced by LGBTQ individuals and the impact on health disparities
  4. Assess their agencies inclusive practices and create at least 2 proactive steps to be more inclusive (this is an optional objective if we are going to conduct an assessment during training)

Trainer: Melissa Moore, Executive Director, We Are Family

Cost: $200 (discounts available for funded partners)

Location:
Fatherhood Project
1380 Ebenezer Road, Suite A
Rock Hill, SC 29730

REGISTER

Registration deadline: January 24, 2018

Back to News List

New Board Members: T. McRoy Shelley, III and Kristy Stoneburner

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

The South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) welcomed two new board members in November 2017: T. McRoy Shelley, III and Kristy Stoneburner. Roy Shelley leads the Litigation Department at Rogers Townsend & Thomas, PC and Kristy Stoneburner is an experienced public health professional. Both board members live in Columbia, SC and will serve a three year term.

View a complete list of our board of directors.

Back to Events List

Making a Difference/Making Proud Choices Training of Facilitators

This training will introduce participants to two research proven curricula—Making a Difference! and Making Proud Choices! — and will provide the skills necessary to implement each of the curriculum with youth. Both curricula are integrated (teen pregnancy and HIV) prevention programs consisting of eight one-hour modules for middle school youth. Both curricula emphasize abstinence as the safest and best choice for adolescents. Making a Difference! emphasizes that young adolescents should postpone sexual activity and provides intensive educational strategies to help them do so. Making Proud Choices! covers abstinence in detail, but also emphasizes the importance of using condoms to reduce the risk of pregnancy and STD among sexually active participants.

Throughout this two-day training participants will learn how to become facilitators of both curricula. In addition, participants will receive a general overview of  core concepts related to reproductive health as it relates to teen pregnancy prevention in South Carolina. Topics covered include Reproductive anatomy/physiology, adolescent growth and development, HIV/STIs, contraceptive technology, and strategies for teaching comprehensive sexuality education that meet the standards set forth by the Comprehensive Health Education Act (CHEA).

As a result of participating in this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the objectives, content, activities, components, and unique features of the Making a Difference! (MAD) and Making Proud Choices! (MPC) curricula.
  2. Understand the theoretical foundation of MAD and MPC and how they are applied in program activities.
  3. Understand the teaching methodologies used in MAD and MPC.
  4. Learn basic information relating to HIV, STDs, adolescent pregnancy prevention, and adolescent sexual development.
  5. Demonstrate teaching condom use, problem solving, and negotiation skills.
  6. Identify their own values and the impact of those values on their ability to effectively teach about adolescent sexuality issues.
  7. Identify guidelines for answering sensitive questions regarding sexuality, HIV, STDs, and adolescent pregnancy prevention.
  8. Identify potential barriers to implementing the Making a Difference

NOTE: You must purchase the curriculum for this training directly from ETR and bring it with you to the training. We will be training from the revised 5th editions, not the school editions.


Trainers: Chris Rollison and Denise Rivera

Cost: $600 (discounts available for in-state and funded partners)

Location:
SC Campaign
1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140
Columbia, SC 29201

REGISTER

Registration deadline: January 10, 2018

Back to Events List

Counseling and Education to Promote Contraceptive Compliance

This highly interactive workshop is a revised and revamped version of Individualized Client Education for Improved Contraceptive Compliance (ICE) and will build on skills of Motivational Interviewing to assist consumers in selecting a method and maintaining compliance to their selected contraceptive method.  As a result of participating in this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain various contraceptive technologies including how they work and barriers and solutions to usage.
  2. Demonstrate use of the following skills in simulation:         
  3. Assess clients’ readiness to change and strategies for effective behavior change counseling.
  4. Employ a model for short-term counseling, including strategies for engaging families and significant others in counseling and education.

One of the SC Campaign's most popular trainers, Jim Sacco, MSW, LCSW, will use a variety of teaching methods to engage participants in real-life scenarios to help them better attend to the needs of youth they serve. 

Cost: $120 (lunch provided)

Location:
SC Campaign 
1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140
Columbia, SC 29201

REGISTER

Space is limited. Registration closes on Tuesday, December 5.

Discounted registration is available to SCARHLI participants and MAPPs providers. Please contact Shannon Lindsay, Training Coordinator at 803-771-7700 for applicable discount codes.

 

Back to Blog List

Support your community this #GivingTuesday

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

By: Alvin Caughman

One thing we love about South Carolina is our state’s commitment to community. You’ll see strangers rolling up their sleeves to help repair homes after a hurricane. You know neighbors who open their homes and hearts when they find out someone’s going through a rough time. And you know everyone in your community does what they can to give our youth the tools they need to succeed.

On November 28, we’re asking you to show us that spirit of support during this year’s #GivingTuesday event.

The fact is, teen pregnancy prevention is a community effort and we can’t do it without you. That’s true whether you have a teenager or a toddler, whether your kids are grown, or whether you never had kids at all.

When you donate to us on November 28, you’ll be supporting:

  • Expanding evidenced-based reproductive health education for teens in South Carolina.
  • Training for teachers, coaches, faith leaders and other adults who work with teens.
  • Advocacy efforts that let your policy makers know where you stand on teen pregnancy prevention.

Sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date on #GivingTuesday and all our teen pregnancy prevention efforts.

comments powered by Disqus
Back to Events List

Making a Difference/Making Proud Choices

This is a closed onsite training. A limited number of additional seats are available. Contact us at training@teenpregnancysc.org or 803-771-7700 for more information.

This training will introduce participants to two research proven curricula—Making a Difference! and Making Proud Choices! — and will provide the skills necessary to implement each of the curriculum with youth. Both curricula are integrated (teen pregnancy and HIV) prevention programs consisting of eight one-hour modules for middle school youth. Both curricula emphasize abstinence as the safest and best choice for adolescents. Making a Difference! emphasizes that young adolescents should postpone sexual activity and provides intensive educational strategies to help them do so. Making Proud Choices! covers abstinence in detail, but also emphasizes the importance of using condoms to reduce the risk of pregnancy and STD among sexually active participants.

Throughout this two-day training participants will learn how to become facilitators of both curricula. In addition, participants will receive a general overview of  core concepts related to reproductive health as it relates to teen pregnancy prevention in South Carolina. Topics covered include Reproductive anatomy/physiology, adolescent growth and development, HIV/STIs, contraceptive technology, and strategies for teaching comprehensive sexuality education that meet the standards set forth by the Comprehensive Health Education Act (CHEA).

As a result of participating in this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the objectives, content, activities, components, and unique features of the Making a Difference! (MAD) and Making Proud Choices! (MPC) curricula.
  2. Understand the theoretical foundation of MAD and MPC and how they are applied in program activities.
  3. Understand the teaching methodologies used in MAD and MPC.
  4. Learn basic information relating to HIV, STDs, adolescent pregnancy prevention, and adolescent sexual development.
  5. Demonstrate teaching condom use, problem solving, and negotiation skills.
  6. Identify their own values and the impact of those values on their ability to effectively teach about adolescent sexuality issues.
  7. Identify guidelines for answering sensitive questions regarding sexuality, HIV, STDs, and adolescent pregnancy prevention.
  8. Identify potential barriers to implementing the Making a Difference

NOTE: You must purchase the curriculum for this training directly from ETR and bring it with you to the training. We will be training from the revised 5th editions, not the school editions.


Trainers: Chris Rollison and Denise Rivera

Cost: $120 (discount available for grantees and funded partners)

Location:
Monck's Corner, SC

Back to News List

South Carolina’s Teen Birth Rate Continues Steady Decline, But There Are Still Gaps in Adolescent Reproductive Health

Thursday, October 5, 2017

October 5, 2017—Columbia, SC: South Carolina’s teen birth rate has declined by 67% since peaking in 1991, continuing decades of success for communities across the state. This includes a 9% decrease from 2015 to 2016, landing the teen birth rate for 15-19 year olds at 23.8 per 1,000 females. Declines over the past 25 years have been most substantial among African American youth ages 15-17 whose teen birth rate has decreased by 82% since 1991. While teen birth rates have decreased for all ages and races in previous years, Hispanic teens (15-19) experienced a 12% increase in teen births from 2015 to 2016. Still, older youth (18-19 year olds) continue to drive the overall South Carolina teen birth rate, currently making up 75% of all teen births among 15-19 year olds.

As the teen birth rate continues to decline, STI and HIV rates remain an area of concern. In 2015, South Carolina ranked in the top 10 nationally for rates of Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and diagnosed HIV for all ages. From 2015-2016, South Carolina saw a 4.6% increase in the rate for Chlamydia, a 16.2% increase in the rate for Gonorrhea, while HIV prevalence saw a 22.7% decrease (15-19 year olds, per 100,000 population).

The South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) continues to focus efforts in this direction by working with organizations like the United Way of Anderson, Helping Hands, Inc. and OCAB Community Action Agency, Inc., through a multi-year project entitled Expanding the Reach.  Other counties actively partnering with the SC Campaign include Bamberg, Barnwell, Darlington and Dillon. We also work with programs in Horry, Richland and Spartanburg Counties. All programs emphasize abstinence as the safest, most effective way to prevent pregnancy. The programs also support knowledge and the use of various forms of birth control and condoms among sexually active teens. This is critical to not only preventing teen pregnancy, but STIs and HIV as well.

The organization is also dedicated to providing public awareness across the state, especially during months like October where we highlight national campaigns, including “Let’s Talk Month”. During the month we encourage open communication between young people and their parents or other trusted adults. Believe it or not, teens want to hear from their parents regarding love, sex, and relationships. Starting age-appropriate conversations early and into early adulthood will help young people make smarter decisions regarding their sexual health. You can learn more about the public awareness campaign and our October community events around SC at teenpregnancysc.org/lets-talk-month.

Beth De Santis, SC Campaign CEO, says A 67% decline in our state’s teen birth rate since 1991 is a point of pride for our state.  Our teens are continuing to make healthier decisions about their futures and we owe this success to the parents and trusted adults in schools, health care centers and youth serving organizations across South Carolina.  While we are impressed with the declines that have been made, we recognize work must continue by all of us to maintain success. 

It is also imperative that communities continue to financially support teen pregnancy prevention efforts whether it be federal, state, corporate or individual funds in order to see continued success in South Carolina.  Investing in prevention will not only benefit our state financially, but improve educational achievement and economic development. 

With 3,696 births to teens in 2016 and a continual increase in STI and HIV rates, we must find solutions when it comes to reaching youth where they need it the most.  We are focusing our work on parent/child communication, the best of comprehensive health education, the healthcare community and normalizing conversations about love, sex and relationships.  It has been and always will be a collective effort that prevents teen pregnancy and we cannot impact this issue or relevant systems without effective collaboration.”

Pages