School Leadership

As school leadership, you play a key role in South Carolina. Achieving reductions in teen pregnancy rates requires a sustained commitment and investment in young people.  In order to accomplish this goal, please consider the following actions—

Become familiar with the law and the Comprehensive Health Education Act (CHEA).

  • The CHEA was enacted in 1988 to ensure that South Carolina students receive an age-appropriate, comprehensive health education program taht encompasses the skills, attitutes and behaviors that promote wellness, health maintenance and disease prevention.
  • At least one time during high school, students must receive 750 minutes of reproductive health education and pregnancy prevention education.
  • Know what your CHEA Committee has adopted in your school district in regards to discussing and demonstrating contraception and birht control.

Encourage the adoption of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programming

  • Work with your local school board, Comprehensive Health Education Committee, School Improvement Council, teachers and school administrators to facilitate the selection of an evidence-based program that fits the needs of your school.
  • Commit to professional development and provide opportunities for teachers to participate in the SC Campaign's facilitator trainings and utilize technical assistance. Check out upcoming trainings on our Events Calendar.

Engage parents and other caring community members.

  • Provide resources for parents on how to talk to their teens about love sex and relationships such as Tips for Parents and NotRightNowSC.org/parents
  • Form partnerships with local businesses to help young people see the connection between academics and future work opportunities. Research shows that providing youth with opportunities for work and education is critical for pregnancy prevention.
  • Become familiar with youth-serving organizations in your community in order to share resources and make referrals.

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Learn about the issue how teen pregnancy affects young people in your county